Give the Gift of DNA Discovery With This Special Offer From 23andMe

23andme review health ancestry kit
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We’ve all heard of 23andMe as a great way to discover your ancestry, and you may have heard your colleagues and favorite celebrities rave about how the insights offered by 23andMe reports can be both informative and actionable. With 23andMe’s Health + Ancestry Kit, your family can receive over 125 personalized genetic reports that feature information on ancestry, traits, health and wellness like genetic weight, caffeine consumption, sleep movement and much more. You already track your steps every day – isn’t it time you better understands how your genes play a role in your well-being?

Whether it’s how weight may be impacted by saturated fat, your likelihood for being lactose intolerant, and more, you’re sure to discover a whole new way of understanding who you are – through your DNA.

23andme review health ancestry kit Image courtesy of 23andMe

These discreet, at-home 23andMe kits include a simple-to-use saliva collection kit, and easy to follow instructions about how it all works. All you have to do is simply spit into the included tube. Secure the lid, making sure that it’s locked tight, register the kit online, and then send the entire sample back to the lab using the included, postage-paid envelope.

In as little as three weeks, you can learn how your genetics may influence everything from your health to your facial features, taste preferences, sleep quality and much more. For your fitness journey, the report will also tell you about your genetic muscle composition and how your weight may be impacted by saturated fat.

More importantly though, the report sends personalized insights about things like your genetic health risk for familial hypercholesterolemia* (or “FH” for short), which is a condition that can cause very high cholesterol levels and affects more than 1.3 million people in the country. People with FH are at increased risk for heart disease and heart attacks at a younger age.

There are over 1,000 genetic variants linked to FH. The 23andMe Health + Ancestry Kit tests for 24 of these genetic variants, which could give you a better understanding of how your genetics may influence your body, so that you and your doctor can start putting a plan of attack into place.

Whether you’re looking for something more special to give as a gift, or just seeking out some answers for yourself, there’s no better time to try out this informative service. Bonus: use our link here to get $30 off a 23andMe Health + Ancestry Kit, from now until May 13.

Find out more about 23andMe’s offerings at 23andMe.com.

This story is sponsored by 23andMe, whose products we use and love.

*The 23andMe PGS test uses qualitative genotyping to detect select clinically relevant variants in the genomic DNA of adults from saliva for the purpose of reporting and interpreting genetic health risks. It is not intended to diagnose any disease. Your ethnicity may affect the relevance of each report and how your genetic health risk results are interpreted. Each genetic health risk report describes if a person has variants associated with a higher risk of developing a disease, but does not describe a person’s overall risk of developing the disease. The test is not intended to tell you anything about your current state of health, or to be used to make medical decisions, including whether or not you should take a medication, how much of a medication you should take, or determine any treatment. The Familial Hypercholesterolemia genetic health risk report is indicated for reporting of one variant in the APOB gene and 23 variants in the LDLR gene and describes if a person has variants associated with an increased risk of developing very high LDL cholesterol, which can lead to heart disease. The majority of the variants included in this report have been most studied in people of European and Lebanese descent, as well as in the Old Order Amish.